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ART1300_Lesson6

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 6 months ago

lesson 6: why do we make art: the state

 

  1. (changes complete); REPLACE CONTENT FROM CH. 11 AND 12
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    1. "You read in Chapter Eleven that portraits employ artistic devices to glorify the ruler. These were: ...symbols (also known as attributes, but called "objects of royalty and prestige" in the textbook)... The chapter offered several examples of images that employ these devices."
    2. edited tense
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    1. "Your textbook identified some of the features such palaces have in common."
    2. "Your textbook also noted that palaces are more than mere homes..."
    3. "The textbook does a good job of introducing two of the most spectacular palaces in the world--Versailles and the Forbidden City--and we will look at these two sites in more detail."
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    1. "And although the construction technique of wood posts and brackets (described in Chapter 3 of your textbook)..."
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    1. "Part of Chapter Eleven addresses public monuments to the greatness of the leader. Once again, the text identifies several commonalities found in these examples of public art regardless of date or geographic location."
    2. "As you read in your textbook, a stele is a vertical stone monument usually combining text and images."
    3. "Therefore, the Victory Stele uses the strategy identified in your textbook..."
    4. "...including the horned crown also worn by the Assyrian Lamassu discussed in your textbook."
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    1. "In Chapter 11 you read about the Arch of Titus..."
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    1. "In our next example, which is also discussed in your textbook, similar elements are used."
    2. "These and hundreds of other brass plaques (made in the lost-wax or cire perdu process described in your textbook)..."
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    1. "This work is discussed in your textbook, but deserves further consideration here."
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    1. "Your textbook identified some of the strategies artists have used to communicate their dissent."
  19. (changes complete); grammatical change
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    1. "...improve the living conditions of the poor. The works in this part of the lesson, therefore, should be considered alongside those labeled "Fighting for the Oppressed" in Chapter 12 of your textbook."
    2. "...for refusing to work. This photograph is much like Hine's photo Leo, 48 Inches High... in Chapter 12 of your textbook."
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    1. STILL NEED TO CHECK ASSIGNMENT, QUIZ, SELF-TEST

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